East Leicester Medical Practice
Uppingham Road Health Centre
131 Uppingham Road
Leicester
LE5 4BP
Tel:  (0116) 3666 44 6

Please see this document for current fees

Why do GPs sometimes charge fees?

Isn't the NHS supposed to be free?

The National Health Service provides most health care to most people free of charge, but there are exceptions: prescription charges have existed since 1951 and there are a number of other services for which fees are charged. Sometimes the charge is made to cover some of the cost of treatment, for example, dental fees; in other cases, it is because the service is not covered by the NHS, for example, providing copies of health records or producing medical reports for insurance companies.

Surely the doctor is being paid anyway?

It is important to understand that many GPs are not employed by the NHS; they are self-employed and they have to cover their costs - staff, buildings, heating, lighting, etc - in the same way as any small business. The NHS covers these costs for NHS work, but for non-NHS work, the fees charged by GPs contribute towards their costs.

What is covered by the NHS and what is not?

The Government's contract with GPs covers medical services to NHS patients, including the provision of ongoing medical treatment. In recent years, however, more and more organisations have been involving doctors in a whole range of non-medical work. Sometimes the only reason that GPs are asked is because they are in a position of trust in the community, or because an insurance company or employer wants to ensure that information provided to them is true and accurate.

Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge their own NHS patients are:

  • accident/sickness certificates for insurance purposes
  • school fee and holiday insurance certificates
  • reports for health clubs to certify that patients are fit to exercise

Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge other institutions are:

  • life assurance and income protection reports for insurance companies
  • reports for the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) in connection with disability living allowance and attendance allowance
  • medical reports for local authorities in connection with adoption and fostering

Why does it sometimes take my GP a long time to complete my form?

Time spent completing forms and preparing reports takes the GP away from the medical care of his or her patients. Most GPs have a very heavy workload and paperwork takes up an increasing amount of their time, so many GPs find they have to take some paperwork home at night and weekends.

I only need the doctor's signature - what's the problem?

When a doctor signs a certificate or completes a report, it is a condition of remaining on the Medical Register that they only sign what they know to be true. In order to complete even the simplest of forms, therefore, the doctor might have to check the patient's entire medical record. Carelessness or an inaccurate report can have serious consequences for the doctor with the General Medical Council (the doctors' regulatory body) or even the Police.

Minor operations are undertaken in a Minor Operations clinic by one of the Doctors, assisted by a Health Care Assistant.

Certain minor operations such as removal of warts, skin tags, in growing toes nails etc can be undertaken by a Doctor at the surgery.
Please book a routine appointment with a Doctor to discuss this. The Doctor will advise you if the procedure can be undertaken at the surgery, and add your name to a list to be booked into the next available Minor Operation clinic.

You will be sent a letter from the surgery advising you of the date and time of your surgery. Please book in at reception when you arrive for your appointment.

Before you have your surgery the Doctor will explain exactly what procedure is being done and why. You will have the opportunity to ask any questions about the procedure. You will then be asked to sign a consent form.

Coil and Implants can be fitted in the surgery by one of the Doctors. Please book a routine appointment with a Doctor to discuss your contraceptive choices. If you decide you would like to have either a Coil or Implant fitted the Doctor will add your name to a list to be booked into the next available Coil clinic at the surgery. The Doctor will explain the procedure to you and ask you to sign a consent form. You will also be given information of what you must do prior to the Coil/ Implant fitting appointment

You will be sent a letter from the surgery advising you of the date and time of your Coil or Implant fitting. Please book in at reception when you arrive for your appointment.

At your Coil or Implant fitting appointment the Doctor will explain exactly what procedure is being done, and check with you that is safe for you to have the Coil or Implant fitted that day. You will have the opportunity to ask any questions about the procedure.

Childhood immunisation clinics are held every Tuesday morning and Wednesday afternoon at the Surgery. Howver, if these days are not suitable for you please speak to a member of our team who can re-arrange this appointment. 

The immunisation clinics are run by a practice nurse and assisted by a Health Care Assistant.

Your child should automatically receive an invitation from children immunisation team to attend for vaccination when they are due. A member of our office team will also call you the day before as a reminder.

If you are concerned your child may be outstanding vaccinations, please contact reception on 0116 3666 44 6 to discuss this with one of the practice nurses.

Please click here to see the current child immunisation schedule.

 

If you are planning to travel abroad, you should complete a travel request form (download Travel Form ), and return this to the surgery reception desk.

Six weeks notice is required to ensure that adequate time is given for the schedule of vaccinations you might require, and that travel appointments are available.

Please contact the surgery one week after returning your completed form to find out if you need to book a travel appointment.
Patients requiring an appointment will be offered an appointment in our designated travel clinics.

Charges apply for some travel vaccinations; and certain private prescription malaria medications, as some are not available on the NHS. For current charges please click here

Payment for any non NHS vaccinations and private prescription malaria medication is required prior to booking the travel appointment.
For more travel information please use the links below:-

Fit For Travel web site click here

NHS Choices travel information click here

Malaria advice click here

Asthma Reviews

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If you have asthma, you will be invited by letter to attend the surgery for an asthma review every year. Your asthma review will usually be undertaken by one of the Practice nurses. Please bring ay inhalers you are currently using to the review appointment. The review appointments are undertaken to ensure that your asthma remains well controlled, and that you are still using the correct type of inhalers for your asthma. The nurse will discuss your current asthma medication with you, and may advise you of changes to this if required.

The Practice nurse may recommend that you also need to book a routine follow up appointment to see one of the Doctors.

For more information on Asthma please click here for the Asthma Uk web site.

COPD reviews

Patients with COPD (Chronic lung disease) will be invited by letter to attend the surgery every year for review of their COPD. Currently this is usually undertaken by one of the Doctors. The review appointments are undertaken to ensure that your COPD remains well controlled, and that you are still using the correct type of inhalers for this. Please bring any inhalers you are currently using to the appointment.

For more information on COPD from NHS Choices please click here

For further information for carers please click here

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Chronic disease clinics for long term conditions such as Diabetes, Heart disease, Kidney disease and Hypertension (high blood pressure) are held by the Practice nurse and Health Care Assistant.

You will be invited by letter every year to attend the surgery for review, with a health care assistant followed by a practice nurse appointment two weeks after. In order for patients to recall when they are due reviews are in line with birthday months and patients will be invitated via letters and one telphone call. 

During the annual review appointment, the nurse will discuss your blood test results; check your weight, blood pressure and urine. She will also check any regular medication that you might be taking. The Practice nurse will advise you when you next need to book an appointment for a blood pressure check or possibly further blood tests.

The Practice nurse may recommend that you also need to book a routine follow up appointment to see one of the Doctors.

For more information on:-

British Heart Foundation please click here

Diabetes UK please click here

Diabetes UK translated material please click here

Visit the links below to see if you can self help or get more inspired to live well. 

We want you to be pro-active about taking care and staying in good health, so we've added the links for Live Well and Wellbeing sections too, so please do check them out, get inspired and share with others!

NHS Choices (Home)nhs choices logo

Patient.info (Home)patient info

When the practice is closed and you feel you need urgent medical advice or help that is not an emergency call 111.  Visit www.nhs.uk/111 for more information.

Choose Better - NHS Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland Services and guidance for choosing the right one.

Get NHS help online by going to www.nhs.uk/health-at-home

 

 

Some of our other services include:

  • 24 Hour Blood Pressuring Monitoring
     
  • Helicobacter Pylori Tests
     
  • Cervical Smears
     
  • Chlamydia Testing
     
  • INR Testing
     
  • NHS Health Checks
     
  • Travel Vaccinations (see Travel Advice)

 

See our Test Results page for information on obtaining your test results.

 

 

 Flu Vaccinations 2020/21

We have ordered the flu vaccines for this year.Delivery is expected at the end of September. In light of the covid pandemic flu vaccinations will be administered slighly differently this year. Help to protect yourself from infection and prevent the spread of flu this winter. For up to date information click:Get flu safe

 

We now have in stock the flu nasal spray for all 2 and 3 year old children. Please contact the surgery to book an appointment. Eligible children are all those born between 1.9.2016 and 31.8.2018. When booking please check that we have your child's ethnihity status recorded on their health records.

 

The adult flu vaccine clinics will start on Friday 2nd October 2020. Please contact the surgery to book an appointment. To help us to make sure we are reaching all groups in our local communities, we are asking patients to check that their GP practice has recorded their ethnicity status in their records when booking

The flu virus typically peaks during the winter months, the best way to help protect yourself and others from catching and spreading flu is to have the flu jab every year.

Flu strains can change from year to year, which means last year’s jab may not protect you from this year’s strains. The vaccine usually provides protection for the duration of that year's flu season.

Getting vaccinated is important each year but this year more than ever people are urged to have the vaccine in order to protect themselves, and the NHS, this winter.

Children aged 2 and 3 years old, plus all primary school aged children and school year 7 in secondary school, will be offered the nasal spray vaccination. The adult flu vaccine is offered free to those in groups at particular risk of infection and complications from flu (for more details see the list at the end of this page).

The groups being offered the adult flu vaccine are:

  • Pregnant women

  • Those aged 65 or over

  • Those aged under 65 with long-term conditions (see list below)

  • Carers

  • Shielded patients and those in the same household aged 18 or over

  • Flu vaccines for 50 - 64 year olds not in any risk groups are available from 1st December 2020

Due to the pandemic, flu vaccination clinics may be held in a slightly different way this year. Clinic logistics are still being finalised and updated information will posted on our webpages when confirmed.

Flu vaccines will be released in batches, according to both availability and also the need to prioritise those most at risk. This means flu clinics will be staggered in the months ahead.

For those who are eligible, GP surgeries across Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are gearing up to provide special clinics to offer patients their annual flu jab.

GPs are asking their patients to book a place in forthcoming flu clinics as soon as they are advertised. Alternatively, you can visit your nearest participating pharmacy. If you are housebound, please speak to your GP practice.

Those who do not fall within the eligible categories for a free NHS vaccination will be able to buy a flu vaccine from their local participating pharmacy.

This year eligibility for the flu vaccination has been extended to those aged 50 to 64 years. Please note that people in the 50 to 64 year old age group will not be vaccinated until November and December, providing there is sufficient vaccine, and no appointments will be offered for this age group until then. This is to ensure that those who are most at risk are vaccinated first. If you are 50 to 64 and you are in one of the other groups which is eligible for the flu vaccination, for example you have a health condition which puts you at risk from flu, you will be invited earlier.

The flu vaccination offers an important health protection. Flu can lead to existing health conditions getting worse or the development of an illness such as bronchitis or pneumonia, or it could even be fatal. A vaccination helps protect the health of a pregnant mother and her child.

You can see the full list of those eligible for a flu vaccination below.

   

Symptoms

Common symptoms of flu include a high temperature, fatigue, headache, general aches and pains and a dry, chesty cough. If you are generally fit and healthy you can usually manage the symptoms at home yourself without seeing a doctor. The best remedy is to rest at home, keep warm and drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Paracetamol or ibuprofen may help lower a high temperature and relieve aches. A pharmacist will be able to provide advice on medication.

People suffering with a cold or flu should avoid going into hospital, GP practice or other health setting to reduce the chance of vulnerable people catching the virus. The flu virus can be very dangerous for the elderly and the infirm particularly if they are already sick. This is a message that applies to people coming into hospital seeking treatment and to people coming to visit relatives.

Help to stop spreading colds and flu.

Colds and flu are caused by viruses and easily spread to other people. Germs from coughs and sneezes survive on hands and surfaces for up to 24 hours. You are infectious until all symptoms are gone which usually takes a week or two.

You can help prevent colds and flu spreading by using tissues to ‘catch it, kill it, bin it’. Washing your hands regularly with soap and water destroys bugs that you may have picked up from touching surfaces used by other people, such as light switches and door handles. It is also important to keep household items clean, including cleaning such items as cups, glasses and towels, especially if someone in your house is ill.

People with worsening symptoms or respiratory problems are advised not to visit a GP surgery or a hospital but to call their GP first or call NHS111 for further advice.

Who is eligible for a free NHS flu vaccine?

In 2020/21, flu vaccinations will be offered under the NHS flu vaccination programme to the following groups:

  • chronic (long-term) respiratory disease, such as severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchitis

  • chronic heart disease, such as heart failure

  • chronic kidney disease at stage three, four or five

  • chronic liver disease

  • chronic neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease or motor neurone disease,

  • learning disability

  • diabetes

  • splenic dysfunction or asplenia

  • a weakened immune system due to disease (such as HIV/AIDS) or treatment (such as cancer treatment)

  • morbidly obese (defined as BMI of 40 and above)

  • all children aged two to eleven (but not twelve years or older) on 31 August 2020

  • people aged 65 years or over (including those becoming age 65 years by 31 March 2021)

  • those aged from six months to less than 65 years of age, in a clinical risk group such as those with:

  • all pregnant women (including those women who become pregnant during the flu season)

  • household contacts of those on the NHS Shielded Patient List, or of immunocompromised individuals, specifically individuals who expect to share living accommodation with a shielded patient on most days over the winter and therefore for whom continuing close contact is unavoidable

  • people living in long-stay residential care homes or other long-stay care facilities where rapid spread is likely to follow introduction of infection and cause high morbidity and mortality. This does not include, for instance, prisons, young offender institutions, university halls of residence, or boarding schools (except where children are of primary school age or secondary school Year 7).

  • those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or who are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill

  • health and social care staff, employed by a registered residential care/nursing home or registered domiciliary care provider, who are directly involved in the care of vulnerable patients/clients who are at increased risk from exposure to influenza.

  • health and care staff, employed by a voluntary managed hospice provider, who are directly involved in the care of vulnerable patients/clients who are at increased risk from exposure to influenza.

  • health and social care workers employed through Direct Payments (personal budgets) and/or Personal Health Budgets, such as Personal Assistants, to deliver domiciliary care to patients and service users. 2. Additionally, in 2020/21, flu vaccinations might be offered under the NHS flu vaccination programme to the following groups:

  • individuals between 50-64 years, following prioritisation of other eligible groups and subject to vaccine supply

 

Address

Address

East Leicester Medical Practice

Uppingham Road Health Centre
131 Uppingham Road
Leicester
LE5 4BP

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